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Bringing In A New Puppy Into Your Home? Here are the Do’s & Don’ts

Bringing In A New Puppy Into Your Home Here are the Do’s & Don'ts

Bringing a new puppy home to join the family is a special time. It should be a positive experience for you and your new canine companion. Happy and confident adult dogs don’t just happen. It’s a mixture of excellent decisions and the correct treatment of the puppy.

To help make training easier for you, here’s our list of Top 10 Training Dos and Don’ts.

 

DO…

Make early, regular visits to your veterinarian for vaccinations and routine health care.

Get your puppy groomed regularly with Aussie Pet Mobile. Your groomer will suggest the frequency that’s right for your pup.

Take your puppy outside frequently. Including after meals or drinking and about every two to three hours when they are young.

Use positive reinforcement. This means rewarding your dog for doing behaviors you want them to continue doing.

Supervise at all times when in public. Use different opportunities to teach them new skills and practice good behavior.

Keep a safe, clean environment for your puppy.

 

DON’TS

Leave food available all the time. Dogs often gain excessive weight or become fussy eaters if allowed to eat any time of the day. And about food, don’t feed generic or low-quality brands of food. There are plenty of high-quality reasonably priced diets on the market. Of course, ask your veterinarian to find a proper brand for your pup.

Scold after the fact. Puppies have a poor sense of time and will not understand being punished for something that happened an hour ago. Instead, place them in a crate, say nothing, and clean up the mess.

Leave your puppy home alone for long stretches. Dog independency needs to be built up gradually. Ensuring your puppy has company as he settles in will increase his confidence.

Allow your puppy to chew, nibble, or bite on people. This can become a serious problem that is difficult to break and may cause injury when the dog is older

Use repeat commands. By doing so, you are actually training her to sit-sit-sit-sit and not sit. He will literally wait for you to say it five times instead of once. Say it just once, then wait for a second or two. It’s important to have single commands in stressful situations in the future to ensure the best safety for you and your dog.